Blog: Wes’s thoughts, articles, and insights

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Engagement is measured by the customer

By Wes Trochlil | May 27, 2020

Engagement is Measured by the Customer I’ve written a bunch about measuring engagement in the past. (Click here to read one of my favorites.) But one thing that’s critically important to understand is that ultimately, engagement is not measured by the association, but by the member or customer. Click here for an example of what I mean. For some …

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New Article Posted

By Wes Trochlil | April 17, 2020

I’ve posted a new article on managing volunteer data. Click here to read it. One thing that distinguishes associations from almost all of their for-profit competitors is volunteers. Whether it’s your board of directors, committee members, speakers, or writers, associations have a strategic advantage in that their “customers” are actually developing the products and services …

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New Article Posted

By Wes Trochlil | February 17, 2020

Over the course of my 20 years of consulting to associations, I’ve run into several situations where the association is moving from a completely custom system (often designed by someone on staff) to an off-the-shelf (OTS) system. (I’ve written before why associations should not build custom systems, but it happens!) While I wholeheartedly support moving …

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Two new articles

By Wes Trochlil | November 20, 2019

I’ve posted two new articles to my site. Click the link on each to read the article. What Causes Project Overruns Expressed Interest vs. Implied Interest

New article – What’s Good in Data Management

By Wes Trochlil | September 27, 2019

I recently read the book Factfulness, which highlights ten things about the world that are better than most people think. (The book is a fascinating read and I highly recommend it. In fact, I think it should be required reading for all high school students!) This got me to thinking (naturally) about the things in data management …

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Older Posts

Are You Answering Your Calls?

February 7, 2019

I’ve written about this before, but apparently I have to keep repeating it. If you’ve got a “generic” email box …

Are You Answering Your Calls? Read More »

Who do you trust?

January 31, 2019

    I was reading an article recently about Warren Buffet’s “rules” for how he chooses companies to invest in. …

Who do you trust? Read More »

Set benchmarks to measure progress

January 24, 2019

It’s impossible to measure progress if you don’t know your starting point. This sounds axiomatic, but too often it is …

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You’ll make incorrect decisions. Acknowledge them and fix it.

January 17, 2019

A client of mine recently wrote the following to me: “It’s so hard to set up a new database and …

You’ll make incorrect decisions. Acknowledge them and fix it. Read More »

"Experience is unobservable to everyone except the person who it happens to."

January 10, 2019

In Dan Gilbert’s book Stumbling on Happiness, he writes: “Experience is unobservable to everyone except the person who it happens …

"Experience is unobservable to everyone except the person who it happens to." Read More »

What is rewarded is repeated

January 7, 2019

The phrase is a bit trite, but nonetheless true. What we give attention to (i.e., praise or rewards), especially as …

What is rewarded is repeated Read More »

A New Year Means New Data Management Habits

January 3, 2019

The new year brings new resolutions. May I suggest that one of your New Year’s resolutions be the creation of …

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Beware the Recency Effect

December 27, 2018

I’ve written in the past about cognitive biases and how they can affect our judgment. One that I didn’t mention in that …

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Know Your Audience Before You Speak

December 20, 2018

This one may seem obvious, but when you’re speaking to anyone, whether it’s one person, a staff meeting, or a …

Know Your Audience Before You Speak Read More »

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