Data Management

Users are important, but don't forget about your data consumers

Last week I wrote about an association with 60 staff but only six users. Today I want to talk about the flip side of that: those staff who are not necessarily users of the system, but consumers of the data. A great example of this is advocacy/government relations. In my experience, while the advocacy/GR department …

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60 staff but only six users; and that's OK

I was working with an association recently, helping them select a new association management system. The association has 60 FTEs, working on a wide variety of issues including regulatory and government affairs. As we worked through the process of identifying their functional needs, it became apparent that although they have a relatively large staff, the number …

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Are your customers' passwords hidden from staff view? They should be!

Are the passwords for your members and customers in your database hidden from staff view (e.g., hashed out or showing a blank field)? Or can you staff see the password that your member has set up for him or herself? Customer passwords should be hidden from staff for one simple reason: As humans, most of keep only …

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Four Elements of Data: Volume, velocity, variety, and veracity

I don’t remember where I first read this, but I love this description of the four elements of data. Volume, velocity, variety, and veracity. Volume is how much data you are actually managing. Velocity is how fast that data is being created or being changed. Variety is how much different data is being collected. Veracity …

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Is data an afterthought at your organization?

I was working with a client recently and discussing how data is currently managed in their organization. During the course of the conversation, my client said “Too often here, data is an afterthought.” What he meant was that very often, programs, products, or services would be developed by one part of the organization or another, …

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