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Data Integrity Manager

I'm always urging my clients to develop staff positions that focus on maintainenance of the database. And I don't mean a dba in the traditional sense (i.e., one who tunes the system and keeps the technology running) but a staffer who is responsible for making the database work for the organization.  

The National Defense Industrial Association recently advertised for a position called "Data Integrity Manager." You can read about it here: http://asi.careerhq.org/jobdetail.cfm?job=2536639  

Hallelujah! Data integrity is crucial to long-term database success. By creating this position, NDIA not only sends the message that data integrity is important, but is improving the likelihood of success with their system. One of the primary reasons users stop using a system is their belief (accurate or unfounded) that "the data is wrong." With a staff person in charge, users can no longer hide behind this excuse. If the data is wrong, the Data Integrity Manager has a responsibility to make it right.

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3 Comments on "Data Integrity Manager"

Thomas Nordby - 7 May 2007 Reply

I appreciate your comment about our posted Data Integrity Manager position. This is something that I decided to do after spending some time analyzing why organizations (including NDIA) continue to struggle with maintaining the accuracy of their data in not just an AMS, but across the board in various database driven systems/applications. I came to the conclusion that this is such a crucial area that someone needs to own this area completely, sharing the responsibility amongst several departments or even several people (which is what usually happens) simply does not work. It's a full time job to develop, implement, and manage data integrity business processes and procedures. Having said that, I envision several staff sharing some of the specific tactical tasks coming from developing the overall approach, but the management of the process should be owned by one person. To take this even further, I strongly believe that you cannot perform effective BI analysis/efforts unless your data integrity/quality is at the highest level. I see many organizations jumping to do BI projects without FIRST having addressed the inconsistencies in their data. This is a very flawed approach as you will be generating BI based on incorrect data, thus, what you end up with is per definition not very "intelligent". In a worst case scenario, this faulty BI analysis could lead to bad business decisions being made for the organization. Thomas Nordby, CAE AVP, Business Operations National Defense Industrial Association tnordby@ndia.org

Wes Trochlil - 7 May 2007 Reply

Thomas, I agree with you completely, especially the points you make about BI. wes

Lynette Beitz - 9 May 2007 Reply

I recently implemented a new staff position for exactly what you described. Also the position is responsible for report writing and data mining. Our member database (Membership Partner) will be interfaced in 2007 so I can produce scorecards and dashboards with financial and non-financial data. I am getting a summer intern through the Mayor's summer program. The intern will make personal phone calls documenting member database changes. The new Database Senior Manager will make the updates to Membership Partner.

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Testimonials

“Wes was able to come in and offer tangible, relevant advice that made us more productive immediately. I value his understanding of databases but more so, his understanding of how nonprofits work. There was no lost time educating him about how membership organizations are “different.” Wes recommended changes in processes as well as tips and tricks that were easy to implement made an immediate positive impact.”

Mary Pat Paris, Executive Director
International Registration Plan

“We came to Wes because we were very frustrated with our existing AMS and we wanted to improve our capabilities as soon as practicable. Wes very quickly helped us through a process of identifying our needs, identifying potential vendors, and selecting a new system that we’ll be able to move into very quickly. I especially appreciated Wes’s candor about our processes as well as the systems we were looking at. He was a great resource to have in a period of high anxiety for our organization. I would highly recommend Wes for any similar project.”

Jack Chiasson, CMP Executive Director
National Association of Life Brokerage Agencies

“Wes was able to come in and offer tangible, relevant advice that made us more productive immediately. I value his understanding of databases but more so, his understanding of how nonprofits work. There was no lost time educating him about how membership organizations are “different.” Wes recommended changes in processes as well as tips and tricks that were easy to implement made an immediate positive impact.”

Mary Pat Paris, Executive Director
International Registration Plan

Mary Pat Paris
International Registration Plan

“This is the second database implementation we’ve done since I have been at Western Arts Alliance (WAA). The first I did on my own. This time we engaged Wes Trochlil as our database planning consultant. Let me tell you, this process is a whole lot easier having Wes on your team! For a small association like WAA, it’s tempting for board and EDs to question the justification and expense of a database planning consultant. But it’s the small associations that need Effective Database Management the most. Wes strengthened our planning process, clarified our needs requirements, helped us steer around solutions that couldn’t meet our objectives, and saved us money in the long haul.”

Tim Wilson, Executive Director
Western Arts Alliance

Tim Wilson
Western Arts Alliance
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